Aimee Ansari

Aimee Ansari

Announcing the first of our speakers!

We are delighted to be opening the day with Aimee Ansari, Executive Director of Translators Without Borders. Aimee is currently living and working in Greece in the refugee camps.  Aimee will be sharing the importance of the work of Translators Without Borders:

“At Translators without Borders, we don’t just challenge the status quo; we challenge the entire system.  TWB has developed pathways to overcome the information and language barriers that face the most vulnerable.”

It seemed appropriate that a day of talks should begin with a discussion of the relevance of appropriate language, language barriers and communication issues.  Tempted as we are to tell you more ….. we don’t want to share the fascinating discussions we have had with Aimee about her talk. You’ll have to listen!

Aimee brings 20 years of experience in leadership positions in large humanitarian and development organizations.  She has worked in several humanitarian crises from the Tajik civil war to the earthquake in Haiti, the conflicts in the Balkans to the Syrian refugee crisis and the conflict in South Sudan. Previous roles that Aimee has worked in include Country Director for Care in South Sudan, Humanitarian Policy Representative for Oxfam in Geneva and Middle East Director for Save the Children in Egypt.

Translators Without Borders: We are saving lives through translation! @TranslatorsWB #LanguageMatters #TranslationMatters

Aimee Ansari will be speaking at 9.30 on November 17th 2017 at The Forum Bath

 

TEDxYouth@Bath on Pinterest

TEDxYouth@Bath on Pinterest

We all have our favourites when it comes to social media. One of the less social but a great way to share images is Pinterest and I have started a board for our TEDx, collecting images that make me think and I hope will make you think too. Take a look at https://uk.pinterest.com/julianhussey/tedxyouthbath/

TEDSummit

TEDSummit

I have spent the last week with 450 fellow TEDsters from 40 nations in beautiful Banff at TEDSummit.  It’s been an extra-ordinary week and I’ve met amazing people.  Most importantly, I have found some amazing speakers for this year’s event 🙂 Ive also heard such wonderful and beautiful ideas from other TEDx curators, like the woman who has started TEDx conferences in prisons and Gareth from Lancashire who holds a TEDx for the police. I’ve seen some magical films that people have made for their events.  Actually the films were extra-ordinary – check out TEDxSydney with babies trying unusual tastes for the first time! The ideas that people had for their event blew me away! We are going to be bringing you wonderful, inspiring speakers and a whole host of activities.

Things that I will take away:

Canada is the best example of multiculturalism I have ever seen and England could learn a trick or two.  Canadians say that the number 2 thing that they are proudest of about their nation is their multiculturalism. What a difference to the UK.

Banff is more beautiful than just about anywhere I have ever been and all I did was take photos of mountains!

That if you build a community of interested people extraordinary things happen.

That TEDx is just the beginning……

IMG_1677

Unable to vote on 23rd? Appoint a proxy – today

Unable to vote on 23rd? Appoint a proxy – today

Some of us can’t get to the polling booths on Thursday 23rd June to cast our votes in the EU referendum. Quite a lot of people, me included, will head to Glastonbury that week (hoping it will be sunnier than last weekend!) But that doesn’t mean we can’t vote. If you do it by the deadline of 5pm TODAY, 15th June, you can appoint someone you trust to cast your vote on your behalf. A proxy.

Obviously you need to trust them to vote the way you tell them! But if you find someone who understands how seriously you are taking this, having a proxy is a great way to avoid missing out on being part of this important decision.

http://www.aboutmyvote.co.uk/register-to-vote/postal-vote-application

Democracy only works if we vote

Democracy only works if we vote

Is voting a skill you need to practise at home for a few years before you can get it right? No.

Is voting something we should take for granted, and not worry about actually getting around to doing? No.

Why not? Because voting – being democratically part of the big decisions about how we are governed – is a human right.

Young people don’t vote as much as older ones. That’s a shame, because younger people and older people often don’t agree on many issues, including on how things should be run and how public money should be spent.

Not using your vote can leave you without influence. And that can’t be a good thing.

Ollie Middleton gave this great talk at our last TEDxYouth@Bath on why we should all use our vote. Take six minutes to see if you agree with him.